I’m a grandparent. I want to spend time with my grandchild. What can I do?

Grandparents often play a significant role in a child’s life. The Family Court recognises the importance of the relationship between a grandparent and a child. In circumstances where a grandparent is not being afforded the opportunity to spend time with their grandchildren, a grandparent can make an application to the Family Court for ‘spend time with’ orders.
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Surrogacy family cleared of abandoning child in Thailand

The Family Court of Western Australia has ruled that the baby with Down syndrome at the centre of an international surrogacy dispute in 2014 (“Baby Gammy”) was not abandoned in Thailand by his Australian parents. Twins were born in Thailand in December 2013 to a Thai surrogate mother, using the Australian man’s sperm and donor eggs, after the Australian parents were unable to conceive a baby. The parents returned to Australia with one of the twins in February 2014 and
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Is mediation for me? Mediation in custody/ parenting cases

Are you involved in a dispute about your children? You are not alone! The number of cases started in the Family Court of Western Australia increased by 6% in the 12 months ending August 2015. You may not be aware that the current time that it takes for a matter to be resolved (at a trial) in the Family Court is 89 weeks from the time an application is first commenced. Rather than wait the 12-18 months to have the
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A Child’s view in the Family Court

In a custody dispute, does the Court consider your child’s views?  How are they presented to the Court? What is a family consultant report (also known as a “wishes” report)? Parenting matters – the child’s best interests When the Family Court decides whether to make a parenting order[1], it must consider the best interests of the child to be the paramount consideration. In determining what is in the child’s best interests, the Court must consider primary and additional considerations which
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US Judge sends kids to jail for refusing to have lunch with their Father

A custody battle in the US state of Michigan has led a judge to sentence three children to serve time in detention after refusing to have lunch with their father. The Daily Telegraph reports that the Oakland County Courthouse in Detroit ordered the children to spend quality time with their Father after their parents’ relationship ended. But the children refused, leading the judge to detain them until they graduated high school. Read the full Daily Telegraph article here.
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To – Hyphenate or Not to – Hyphenate

When the Family Court is asked to make a decision about a child because the parents are unable to agree, its decision-making must result in an outcome that is in the best interests of the child, after applying Part VII of the Family Law Act 1975 to the unique facts and circumstances of each individual matter. At times, parties can come up with the most original reasons as to why their proposals will be in their child’s best interests. Take
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